Victorian Tumblr Themes
The Stuarts
William and Mary
By Sir James Thornhill

William and Mary

By Sir James Thornhill

Daughters of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange 
By Gerrit van Honthorst

Daughters of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange 

By Gerrit van Honthorst

Charles I on the walls of Chester
By Robert Alexander Hillingford

Charles I on the walls of Chester

By Robert Alexander Hillingford

King William III
by Unknown artistoil on canvas, circa 1690

King William III

by Unknown artist
oil on canvas, circa 1690

Charles Fitzroy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, Grandson of Charles II and Barbara Villiers

By Sir Godfrey Kneller

Charles Fitzroy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, Grandson of Charles II and Barbara Villiers

By Sir Godfrey Kneller

Barbara Talbot (1665–1763), Viscountess Longueville, as a Girl
by Godfrey Kneller

Barbara Talbot (1665–1763), Viscountess Longueville, as a Girl

by Godfrey Kneller

Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern
By Gerrit van Honthorst
Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern , 5 October 1625 – 10 March 1663, was the sixth son of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (of the House of Wittelsbach), the “Winter King” of Bohemia, by his consort, the English princess Elizabeth Stuart. 
Edward, the younger brother of Prince Rupert of the Rhine, was said to be exceptionally good looking, with black hair and black eyes. 
At the age of twenty one Edward married a French Catholic bride eight years his senior. Anne de Gonzague, daughter of the Duke of Nevers, was celebrated in Parisian society for her wit, beauty and wealth. Her affairs were well known but after she fell in love with Edward her only intrigues were political and she became a well known writer. Upon his marriage Edward converted to Catholicism, despite his mothers threats to disown him. Together they had three daughters.
If Edward had not converted to Catholicism, it is possible that the English throne would have been inherited by his descendants rather than those of his Protestant sister, Sophia, Electress of Hanover.
 
 

Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern

By Gerrit van Honthorst

Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern , 5 October 1625 – 10 March 1663, was the sixth son of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (of the House of Wittelsbach), the “Winter King” of Bohemia, by his consort, the English princess Elizabeth Stuart. 

Edward, the younger brother of Prince Rupert of the Rhine, was said to be exceptionally good looking, with black hair and black eyes. 

At the age of twenty one Edward married a French Catholic bride eight years his senior. Anne de Gonzague, daughter of the Duke of Nevers, was celebrated in Parisian society for her wit, beauty and wealth. Her affairs were well known but after she fell in love with Edward her only intrigues were political and she became a well known writer. Upon his marriage Edward converted to Catholicism, despite his mothers threats to disown him. Together they had three daughters.

If Edward had not converted to Catholicism, it is possible that the English throne would have been inherited by his descendants rather than those of his Protestant sister, Sophia, Electress of Hanover.

 

 

James II as Duke of York
By Godfrey Kneller

James II as Duke of York

By Godfrey Kneller

Charles I
By Ernest Crofts

Charles I

By Ernest Crofts

michaelmoonsbookshop:

Systema Horti - culturae or The art of gardening by John Worlidge published 1677
'Systema Horti-culturae' is a major text for the relation of English gardening to horticulture and the economy of country estates. Worlidge is much concerned with the English climate, soil, and conditions in his discussions of estate management. But he also pays serious attention to garden design — advising on grottoes, statues, walks, arbours, and so forth — and urges both the large landowner and 'the honest and plain Countryman' to improve 'his Ville'. 
this copy is showing its age and is somewhat worn - well used for 336 years - published during the reign of King Charles II

michaelmoonsbookshop:

Systema Horti - culturae or The art of gardening by John Worlidge published 1677

'Systema Horti-culturae' is a major text for the relation of English gardening to horticulture and the economy of country estates. Worlidge is much concerned with the English climate, soil, and conditions in his discussions of estate management. But he also pays serious attention to garden design — advising on grottoes, statues, walks, arbours, and so forth — and urges both the large landowner and 'the honest and plain Countryman' to improve 'his Ville'. 

this copy is showing its age and is somewhat worn - well used for 336 years - published during the reign of King Charles II

melancholytimelord:

"At which point, everyone did agree - The History of Fishes was the most marvelous book, ever!”

King Charles II

King Charles II

Archibald Campbell (1629–1685), 9th Earl of Argyll, Confederate of the Duke of Monmouth
by unknown artist

Archibald Campbell (1629–1685), 9th Earl of Argyll, Confederate of the Duke of Monmouth

by unknown artist

margaretbeaufort:

܀ history meme ܀ six relationships: Charles I (x) and Henrietta Maria (x) (1/6)
↳ husband and wife

Amidst the turmoil and bloodshed during the English Civil Wars (1642-9), came about a remarkable, passionate and turbulent relationship between King Charles I and his wife, Henrietta Maria of France. Though both were of different temperaments, Charles being far more peaceful than his warlike wife, and with opposing religious convictions, they found common ground in the arts and ideas on platonic love. The ardent affection that they grew to hold for one another makes them one of the greatest love affairs in the British monarchy to date.

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